• Energy & Power

Choosing a Programmable Thermostat



Because are a relatively , you should learn as much as you can before selecting a unit. When shopping for a thermostat, bring information with you about your current unit, including the brand and model number. Also, ask these questions before buying a thermostat:

  • Does the unit’s clock draw its power from the heating system’s low-voltage electrical control circuit instead of a battery? If so, is the clock disrupted when the furnace cycles on and off? Battery-operated back-up thermostats are preferred by many homeowners.
  • Is the thermostat compatible with the electrical wiring found in your current unit?
  • Are you able to install it yourself, or should you hire an or a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) contractor?
  • How precise is the thermostat?
  • Are the programming instructions easy to understand and remember? Some thermostats have the instructions printed on the cover or inside the housing box. Otherwise, will you have to consult the instruction booklet every time you want to change the setback times?

Most automatic and programmable thermostats completely replace existing units. These are preferred by many homeowners. However, some devices can be placed over existing thermostats and are mechanically controlled to permit automatic setbacks. These units are usually powered by batteries, which eliminates the need for electrical wiring. They tend to be easy to program, and because they run on batteries, the clocks do not lose time during power outages.

mon. tue. wed. thu. fri. sat. sun.
6:00am 6:00am 6:00am 6:00am 6:00am 8:00am 8:00am
68°f 68°f 68°f 68°f 68°f 68°f 68°f
7:30am 7:30am 7:30am 7:30am 7:30am
60°f 60°f 60°f 60°f 60°f
5:00pm 5:00pm 5:00pm 5:00pm 5:00pm
68°f 68°f 68°f 68°f 68°f
10:00pm 10:00pm 10:00pm 10:00pm 10:00pm 10:30pm 10:30pm
62°f 62°f 62°f 62°f 62°f 62°f 62°f

Before you buy a programmable thermostat, chart your weekly habits including wake up and departure times, return home times, and bedtimes, and the temperatures that are comfortable during those times. This will help you decide what type of thermostat will best serve your needs.

A programmable thermostat can pay for itself in energy saved within four years.

Other Considerations

The location of your thermostat can affect its performance and efficiency. Read the manufacturer’s installation instructions to prevent “ghost readings” or unnecessary furnace or air conditioner cycling. Place thermostats away from direct sunlight, drafts, doorways, skylights, and windows. Also make sure your thermostat is conveniently located for programming.

Some modern heating and cooling systems require special controls. pumps are the most common and usually require special setback thermostats. These thermostats typically use special algorithms to minimize the use of backup electric resistance systems. Electric resistance systems, such as electric baseboard heating, also require thermostats capable of directly controlling 120 volt or 240 volt line-voltage circuits. Only a few companies manufacture line-voltage setback thermostats.

A Simpler Way to Control Your Environment

The best thermostat for you will depend on your life style and comfort level in varying house temperatures. While automatic and programmable thermostats save energy, a manual unit can be equally effective if you diligently regulate its setting— and if you don’t mind a chilly house on winter mornings. If you decide to choose an automatic thermostat, you can set it to raise the before you wake up and spare you some discomfort. It will also perform consistently and dependably to keep your house at comfortable temperatures during the summer heat, as well.

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, United States , March 1997